All posts filed under: Plants

Salvia Salivation

The Salvia. Years of association with Gaudí coloured council bedding displays the humble Salvia has so much more to offer. From Seasoned sage (Salvia officinalis) to Chia seed (Salvia hispanica) the genus spans from the Americas to Asia. Two years ago I discovered the garden of Rolando Uria, the man behind Salvia Amistad in Mar del Plata, Argentina during one of my many visits to South America. Everything was organised online, all in Spanish, and a five hour bus journey commenced from Buenos Aires. On arrival and as a suprise, I was introduced also to Robin Middleton who was also there visiting Rolando from the UK. Robin also has a diverse collection of salvias in Bagshot. He raised Salvia × jamensis ‘Peter Vidgeon’ named after his partner Peter.   Yesterday I finally got to visit Robins diverse collection of beautiful salvias as seen from the photo galery at this end of the blog, in which I took here. The day was perfect; overcast with a rain free afternoon. Bright sun bleaches the flowers you see. A bonus was …

The Horticultural Games

A beautiful sunny June morning finds me at the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park (QEOP). Waiting outside the aquatics centre a raucous bunch of fellow horticulturists formed. Excited not by also the pub meal but the tour of the park by Dr. Phil Askew, Project Sponsor Parklands and Public Realm at QEOP. Over thirty of us were in attendance from all walks of life in the horticultural world. The location was Stratford, East London, where over one hundred hectares where many languages are spoken. From its industrious two hundred year history the land was a polluted wreck. So how was this site going to become one of the historic highlights of British Olympic history? The answer lies in lots of planning and a legacy which has and will allow the site to become a haven for wildlife and an open space for people to enjoy now the games are well and truly in the past. Dr Askew explains that from the start the whole concept of the park was to have longevity unlike many other countries …

Christmas trees. The Decision…

It’s nearly December. The John Lewis advert has been on and everyone has shed a slight tear. Anything and everything gets over commercialised and the true meaning of Christmas is overdressed with buy this and buy that marketing from various companies cashing in on the season. Oh and then there is the Christmas tree. Real or fake? The family debate rocks up every year on what type to have. Children shouting I want that one whilst their parents eyes avoid the tag price. From previously working with Real Christmas trees for over five years, I’ve seen it all. Theft, arguing and tree mix ups. The delivery of 1000s of trees, the broken pallets, the un-netting, the grading, individual pricing. The customer determined to fit a four inch stump into a three inch stand. All this in a six week period. Joy! Well, with my experience in working with real trees I hope this information helps you out when thinking about buying yours. Question 1: It’s a Christmas tree. It doesn’t mater what type, it’s a …